6 Social Marketing Mistakes Business Owners Make

I’ll tell you right off the top: I’m not a social marketing expert. I have to work hard to create content, get followers and improve engagement. Many small business owners face this challenge. I do know this: 1. You don’t have to be a social marketing expert to get good results and 2: You should use social marketing as a part of your overall marketing strategy, not your only marketing strategy.

What I’ve learned isn’t about “hacking growth” or whatever is trendy. It’s about tested and true practices. Once you’ve created a repeatable social media model, you can use it to consistently develop and grow your brand. I’ve made a few mistakes while developing my own model. Here are some of them…

1. Don’t share with your network. Anyone with a successful social media program had to start somewhere – and that somewhere was probably with nothing. The first step is to let your friends and family know what you are doing. Don’t keep it a secret from anyone.  People, by their nature, want to help other people. Count on your personal network to be the starting point for followers, readers and likers. Enlist a few trusted friends to be your editors and proof-readers. Assuming you’re on Facebook with a few followers, consider posting an honest message that directly asks friends to check out your new page or website and specifically ask them to like and share your posts. Real friends and associates will happily oblige.

2. Change your message often, be inconsistent. I speak all the time about finding or creating a business model that works and then finding a way to repeat it.  My article on this topic was published not too long ago.  Please click here to read it. The message is just as true in marketing. Decide who you are and how you want to be perceived before you start broadcasting to the world. “Disruptor”, a trendy word right now, means someone who will break the mould, attack from different angles and become unexpected. While that is catchy and can have positive short term effects, if it distracts too much from what your core brand is it will only leave your prospects and customers confused in the long run.

3. Leave long gaps without activity.There’s no faster way to lose your followers’ interest than to not provide them with new content. Try to set yourself up on a schedule − again, repeatable consistency. Post new content on whatever schedule is suitable for your business, whether it’s daily, weekly, or bi-weekly, just make sure it gets done. People will get used to seeing new material from you at certain times and that is a good thing. If you like to work in flurries of activity or in the middle of the night, use a scheduling tool so your content is published when it’s the right time and people are looking. If you don’t have new content, be sure to keep your platforms active with quality and relevant re-posts. Share other’s work that your followers might find interesting and useful.

4. Don’t follow up. Now that you’ve been delivering great content and attracting some followers, they will start to respond. They will comment on posts, share your ideas and give you their email addresses to receive more. Now that you have their attention, it’s time to act. Thank people for their activity. Send them direct messages when it’s appropriate. Email material to those who gave you their addresses.  Create a personal connection that makes it just a little bit harder to turn away from. Not following up is like starting a conversation and not saying anything after the introduction. Keep talking! You are competing for your followers’ attention.

5. Don’t pay attention to peers, competitors or people smarter than you. You can learn something from everyone – so find out what it is. It is unlikely that what you are doing has never been done before. Research and find out the best practices of related businesses and your competitors. What are they doing that seems to be working? What can you learn to avoid from them? Look to leaders in your industry and see what they are doing. Better yet, ask them! Try to engage with them and get some good coaching and advice out of the connection. 

6. Use ONLY social marketing for your business. The point here is to look at the broader concept of marketing for your business. The reality is many people get caught up in social media as the only marketing they do. You can be disengaged and just sit behind your computer sending words out into space, but quality marketing has to extend beyond that. It has to make an emotional connection to drive activity. Make sure your marketing goes beyond Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and others. Different parts of your strategy support the others. Find ways to meet prospects face to face. Make it meaningful. Make it personal.

There may be a magic formula for successful social marketing, but I don’t know what it is. The marketing formula that has worked for me for more than 20 years of business ownership is a steady, consistent and quality brand message. Be engaging. Be interesting. Make social marketing personal.

I always appreciate feedback. Please feel free to comment. To find out more please contact me at businessmattersconsulting.com or of course at Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn!

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7 Mistakes When Choosing a Franchise

There are many common mistakes people make when purchasing their first franchise. I’ve seen these before countless times, in fact, I’ve been guilty of many of them myself! It’s so easy to get caught up in the emotion of buying a business, that we often overlook important steps in the process.  Don’t lose sight of the fact that this is a long term relationship that must be mutually beneficial.  You are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you!

Here are some common pitfalls to avoid when selecting a franchise to get involved with.

1. Don’t go too far outside of your knowledge base.  There will be lots to learn, new experiences, new procedures, new people, new everything! Keep some familiarity and comfort by choosing a business that is familiar to you.  Don’t get sold on hype – go with a business you know something about.  Have you worked in this industry before?  Does it provide a product or service you love and are familiar with?

2. Don’t base the decision on the number of units.  Size doesn’t matter!  There are lots of great concepts with very few units, and lots of really bad ones with hundreds of units.  Be aware of franchisors that put too much of their marketing weight behind the number of units they have or are planning to have.  If they’re growing, that’s great…just don’t let it over-influence you.

3. Don’t base the decision on their ‘ranking’.  Ever notice that it seems like every car you see on TV has won an award?  There are lots of organizations that supply awards! Like size, ranking is a piece of the puzzle, but not the whole picture.  There are lots of associations and organizations that rank franchises.  Understand what the ranking is and what its context is.  Best in category? Fastest Growers? Highest satisfaction? Best gas mileage?

4. Does the business align with your lifestyle?  Make sure that you have a clear understanding of the requirements of the business.  Bars and restaurant can require late hours. Coffee shops require early mornings.  Does the expected schedule line up with your personal life – family, friends, activities?  Too much conflict may lead to unhappiness in pretty short order.

5.Not getting a lawyer to review your documents.  This one happens all the time and it’s crazy!  Contracts and franchisee agreements are often over 50 pages of legal jargon, plus amendments, assignments, leases and on and on.  The cost of a good legal review and advice is nothing compared to finding out down the road you missed an important detail.  I’ve seen lots of franchisees that tell me they didn’t know about sales minimums, non-compete clauses, renovation requirements, territory restrictions, trademark infringement, transfer clauses and many others.  You’re making a deal that’s probably 10 to 25 years or more – a little diligence now is well worth the investment.

6. Not calling existing franchisees.  I always wonder about managers that make a significant hire without checking references…are they so sure they’re right they don’t want to risk hearing bad news?  This situation is no different.  You should be provided a list of franchisees, but not until you’re disclosed.  Start earlier in the process – look them up and call the franchisees.  Ask for a few minutes of their time and tell them why you are calling. Have questions prepared such as whether or not projections are realistic, how is the franchisee/franchisor relationship, etc.  You’ll get amazing answers – probably good and bad.  If you hear a lot of negativity though, that should be a red flag.  Be sure to get clarification on anything that comes up.

7. No exit strategy.  Here’s one I have been guilty of.  You get so excited in the process and your new venture you think it’s going to be all rainbows and puppy dogs forever.  You may never consider what happens when things change – and they always do!  Find out now how you can sell or transfer your business.  Will it even have a resale value? Find out if you can wind it down and walk away.  Will your franchisor buy your business back?  Some of these options will be spelled out in your agreement and others won’t be mentioned. Ask yourself “What is the worst case scenario?” and have a contingency plan for that.

Franchising is an exciting way to fulfill your dreams of being your own boss and a business owner.  Being part of a terrific organization can reduce your risk and instill a sense of pride.  There can also be many pitfalls and challenges you may not consider.  Hopefully I’ve shed some light on a few so you can avoid them.

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to ask!

Please visit us at businessmattersconsulting.com to learn more.